Biala and Brustlein

September 5 – October 12, 2013

Daniel Brustlein
Self Portrait with Biala in Blue
1963
oil on canvas
56 1/2 x 35 inches

Daniel Brustlein
Deux Personnages (grey)
c.1965
oil on canvas
9 1/4 x 12 5/8 inches

Daniel Brustlein
Notre Dame
1965
oil on canvas
51 x 64 inches

Daniel Brustlein
Le Marché à Venise
1982
oil on canvas
36 x 25 1/2 inches

Daniel Brustlein
Homme devant la mer
1982
oil on canvas
63 1/2 x 45 inches

Daniel Brustlein
L'Avenue
1968
oil on canvas
39 3/8 x 19 3/4 inches

Daniel Brustlein
Standing Girl (Hermine)
c.1964
oil on canvas
60 x 18 1/2 inches

Biala
Trois Personnages
1973
oil on canvas
13 x 16 1/8 inches

Biala
Chat Couché
c.1975
oil on canvas
15 x 18 inches (tondo)

Biala
Black Cupboard
1975
oil on canvas
13 7/8 x 10 5/8 inches

Biala
Untitled (La cour rue Bertrand)
c.1982
oil on canvas
51 x 63 3/4 inches
Private Collection

Biala
Snow in the Countryland
1976
oil on canvas
47 x 47 1/2 inches

Biala
Untitled (View of the Bay, Provincetown)
c.1965
oil with collage on canvas
15 x 18 inches

Biala
Façade Paris
1985
oil on canvas
45 x 57 1/2 inches

Biala
The Birdfeeder
1983
oil on canvas
39 x 28 1/2 inches

Biala
Figure rouge dans un interior
1974
oil on canvas
16 1/4 x13 inches

Daniel Brustlein
Biala et le Chat
1969
oil on canvas
51 1/2 x 64 inches

Press Release

The Tibor de Nagy Gallery is pleased to present a two-person exhibition of paintings by American artist Biala (1903 - 2000) and her husband Daniel Brustlein (1904 – 1996). The exhibition will be the first time the gallery explores the paintings of her lesser-known husband and their fertile creative life together.

The exhibition will comprise a group of oil paintings, many of Paris where the couple lived for over fifty years, starting in 1947. Others depict figures, including a double portrait by Brustlein seated with his wife on a bench in a landscape.

Biala, whose painting career spanned most of the 20th Century, developed a style that was a synthesis of the intimacy and light often associated with early French Modernism, and the painterly directness and active brush strokes of Abstract Expressionism. Brustlein’s paintings are likewise, direct, simplified, but often have a greater emphasis on the geometry of the architecture of Paris.

Biala was born in the town of Bialystok, Poland. In 1913 she immigrated to the United States with her mother and brother, Jack Tworkov. Brustlein was born in France and made his way to America, where he settled in New York, becoming a citizen in 1933. He gained attention as cartoonist for The New Yorker. Later, he started to paint full-time. Biala and Brustlein met in New York in 1940. They were married in 1943.

Biala’s paintings have been the subject of numerous gallery exhibitions in New York and Paris, and were included in major museum exhibitions including five Whitney Annuals. She had seven solo shows with the legendary Stable Gallery. Her work is in many museum collections in the United States and France,

The gallery exhibition coincides with Biala: Vision and Memory at the Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College. The show runs September 12-October 27.